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Working women and stress.

Authors
Swanson-NG
Source
J Am Med Women's Assoc 2000 Apr-May; 55(2):76-79
NIOSHTIC No.
20020825
Abstract
Occupational stress is a growing problem in US workplaces and may be a problem of particular magnitude for working women, in part because of sex-specific job stressors (sex discrimination and difficulties combining work and family). Although such stressors have received little research attention until recent years, new research indicates that these stressors may have a negative impact on health and well-being above and beyond the effects of general job stressors (work overload, skill underutilization, etc). A number of stress-reduction strategies have been shown to be useful for working women, ranging from the more common individual stress management techniques to higher-level interventions focused on removing the sources of occupational stress. This article provides a brief overview of occupational stress as it affects working women and presents research on approaches for reducing the negative effects of job stress.
Keywords
Demographic-characteristics; Sex-factors; Workers; Work-environment; Worker-health; Stress; Job-stress; Women
Publication Date
20000401
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
2000
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
0098-8421
NIOSH Division
DART
Source Name
Journal of the American Medical Women's Association
State
OH
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