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Evaluation of percutaneous penetration of natural rubber latex proteins.

Authors
Hayes-BB; Afshari-A; Millecchia-LL; Willard-PA; Povoski-SP; Meade-BJ
Source
Toxicol Sci 2000 Aug; 56(2):262-270
NIOSHTIC No.
20020690
Abstract
Latex allergy is recognized worldwide as a serious health risk. To date, exposure assessment and intervention strategies have focused primarily on respiratory protection; this work evaluates the potential role of dermal protein penetration in the development of latex allergy. In vitro penetration models using flow-through diffusion cells and both human surgical specimens and hairless guinea pig skin (CrL: IAF/HA) demonstrated iodinated latex proteins (ammoniated and non-ammoniated) penetrating into and through both intact and abraded skin. Although less than 1% penetration was observed with intact skin, up to 23% of latex proteins applied to abraded skin were recovered from receptor fluid within 24 h of exposure. Phosphoimaging of the concentrated effluent revealed proteins ranging in size from 3 to 26 kDa. Using a (3)H(2)O penetration assay to evaluate barrier integrity, the amount of latex protein penetration was found to positively correlate with the degree of dermabrasion. Immunohistochemistry of the skin localized latex proteins in the Langerhans cell-rich epidermis and in the dermis. Both in vitro penetration studies and immunohistochemistry supported the use of hairless guinea pig skin as a surrogate for human skin in evaluating latex protein penetration. In studies performed in vivo, 35% of hairless guinea pigs topically exposed to latex proteins (100 microg) 5 days per week for 3 months demonstrated elevations in latex-specific IgG1. The implication for these data is that the skin is not only a plausible route for latex sensitization but can be a major exposure route when the integument has been compromised.
Keywords
Allergens; Allergies; Gloves; Protective-clothing; Protective-materials; Animals; Animal-studies; Laboratory-animals; Skin-absorption; Skin-exposure
Contact
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA.
Publication Date
20000801
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
bhms8@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2000
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1096-6080
NIOSH Division
OD
Source Name
Toxicological Sciences
State
DC
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