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C8-arylguanine and C8-aruladenine formation in calf thymus DNA from arenediazonium ions.

Authors
Gannett-PM; Powell-JH; Rao-R; Shi-X; Lawson-T; Kolar-C; Toth-B
Source
Chem Res Toxicol 1999 Mar; 12(3):297-304
NIOSHTIC No.
20000966
Abstract
Arylhydrazides, arylhydrazines, and N-alkyl-N-arylnitrosamines are metabolized to arenediazonium ions which yield C8-arylpurine adducts in calf thymus and cellular DNA. The mechanism of adduct formation has not been fully elucidated. C8-Arylguanine adducts likely form from direct aryl radical (Ar*) addition to the C8 position of guanine. However, the amounts of C8-aryladenine adducts measured here are inconsistent with direct radical attack at the C8 position of adenine. An intermediate product, an aryltriazene, is likely formed which then decomposes to the C8-aryladenine adduct. We have demonstrated that N1-aryl-N3-purinyltriazene adducts are formed from a variety of para-substituted arenediazonium ions with adenine. Decomposition of the N1-aryl-N3-purinyltriazene, at high pH and elevated temperatures, has been shown to give C8-aryladenine derivatives, and a free radical mechanism for this process has been proposed. Here we show that this process can occur under physiological conditions and that the C8-aryladenine adduct can be quantitated by HPLC. ESR studies, in which DMPO was used as a spin trap, have been used to demonstrate the intermediacy of aryl radicals during the decomposition of the N1-aryl-N3-purinyltriazenes and to demonstrate that this process also occurs in calf thymus (ct) DNA treated with arenediazonium ions. These results suggest the involvement of an aryl radical in the formation of the observed DNA adducts. Finally, we have found that the treatment of ct DNA with arenediazonium ions produces a significant amount of depurination. Both the formation of C8-arylguanine and C8-aryladenine adducts and the generation of apurinic sites may contribute to the genotoxicity of arylhydrazides, arylhydrazines, N-alkyl-N-arylnitrosamines, and arenediazonium ions.
Keywords
Genotoxic-effects; Hydrogen-ion-activity; In-vitro-studies; Cell-metabolism; Metabolic-study; Decomposition-products
Contact
School of Pharmacy West Virginia University P.O. Box 9530 Morgantown, WV 26506-9530
CODEN
CRTOEC
Publication Date
19990301
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1999
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
0893-228X
NIOSH Division
HELD
Source Name
Chemical Research in Toxicology
State
WV; NE
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