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Criteria for a recommended standard... occupational exposure to allyl chloride.

Authors
NIOSH
Source
NIOSH 1976 Sep; :1-87
NIOSHTIC No.
20000337
Abstract
The recommended standards include an exposure limit of 1.0 ppm as a time-weighted concentration for up to 10-hour work shift in a 40-hour work week, with a ceiling concentration of 3.0 ppm for 15 minutes. Provisions are included for sampling, collection, analysis, pre-employment medical examination, periodic examinations, first-aid, medical records, labeling and posting, personal protective equipment (respiratory protection including respirator requirements, eye protection and skin protection), informing employees, emergency procedures involving allyl chloride, control of airborne allyl chloride, storage, handling and general work practices, waste disposal, confined spaces, sanitation, monitoring and recordkeeping. Criteria include the purpose of the standards, biologic effects of exposure (including the extent of exposure, historical reports, effects on humans, epidemiologic study, animal toxicity, correlation of exposure and effect, carcinogenesis, mutagenesis and eratogenesis), environmental data and analytical methods, basis for previous standards and for the present recommended standard and research needs.
Keywords
Industrial-hygiene; Industrial-medicine; Hazardous-materials; Protective-clothing; Medical-examinations; Physiological-effects; Monitors; Chlorine-compounds; Threshold-limit-values; Occupational-safety; Toxic-materials; Exposure-levels
CAS No.
107-05-1
Publication Date
19760901
Document Type
Numbered Publication; Criteria Document;
Funding Type
Contract
Fiscal Year
1976
NTIS Accession No.
PB-267071
NTIS Price
A06
Identifying No.
(NIOSH) 76-204; Contract-099-74-0031
NIOSH Division
DCDSD
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
MD; CA
Performing Organization
Stanford Research Institute
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