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NIOSH hazards controls HC28 - controlling chemical hazards during the application of artificial fingernails.

Authors
NIOSH
Source
NIOSH 1999 Jan; :1-2
NIOSHTIC No.
20000287
Abstract
Artificial fingernail products are made from many chemicals, but the main one in most of these products is ethyl methacrylate (EMA). In 1974 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration outlawed a similar chemical, methyl methacrylate (MMA), used in fingernail products. MMA was proven harmful to nail technicians and customers. However, both MMA and EMA can cause contact dermatitis, asthma, and allergies in the eyes and nose--all problems that nail technicians know about. Both can make the eyes, nose, and other mucous membranes sting, become red, and swell. Customers are at risk, too. Because it is often difficult to tell which chemical in a nail salon is causing a sensitivity or allergy, it is best to control your exposure before you become sensitized. In the nail salon, to get rid of EMA in the air you breathe, you should apply artificial fingernails at a ventilated work table. It is also helpful to keep all bottles of fingernail liquid tightly capped. Finally, you should look at your work habits to see if they can be improved.
Keywords
Methacrylates; Dermatitis; Allergies; Exposure-levels; Exposure-limits; Hazards; Contact-dermatitis; Bronchial-asthma; Allergic-reactions; Risk-analysis; Risk-factors; Ventilation; Ventilation-equipment; Respiratory-system-disorders; Allergic-disorders; Sensitization
CAS No.
97-63-2; 80-62-6
Publication Date
19990101
Document Type
Numbered Publication; Hazard Control
Fiscal Year
1999
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
(NIOSH) 99-112; HC-28
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS; EID
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
OH
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