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Effects of direct reduction upon mineral supply requirements for iron and steel production.

Authors
Larwood-GM
Source
Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, IC 8583, 1973 Jun; :1-94
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
10009448
Abstract
Contemporary iron and steel production and direct reduction processes have been studied to identify and estimate the potential effects of direct reduction on mineral consumption. Contemporary patterns of mineral raw material and energy consumption were determined from a study of the 1964-70 period. Major changes were observed in requirements for 14 of 20 principal commodities. Average practice in 1970 was compared to best practice to estimate the potential effects of implementing existing technology without recourse to direct reduction. Potential effects of direct reduction were estimated by comparing the mineral requirements for 95 percent reduced pellets with 1970 best practice technology for two cases of use: (1) complete substitution for hematite pellets in blast furnace burdens and (2) partial substitution (40 percent) for scrap in electric furnace steel charges. Effects upon mineral supplies are described; important collateral factors are analyzed, and the principal metallurgical, industrial, and environmental consequences of implementing direct reduction are discussed. Direct reduction will (1) create a large demand for low-gangue iron ore, (2) relieve the dependence of the steel industry on coking coal, and (3) permit great increases in furnace productivity, both in blast furnace ironmaking and electric arc furnace steelmaking.
Keywords
Steel-foundries; Steel-industry; Minerals
Publication Date
19730601
Document Type
IH; Information Circular
Fiscal Year
1973
NTIS Accession No.
PB-221839
NTIS Price
A06
Identifying No.
IC-8583
NIOSH Division
EFOC
Source Name
Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, IC 8583
State
PA
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