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Potential Importance of Sulfate Reduction Processes in Wetlands Constructed to Treat Mine Drainage.

Authors
Hedin-RS; Hammack-RW; Hyman-DM
Source
Ch 38B in Constructed Wetlands for Waste Water Treatment Lewis Pub Chelsea Mi Pp 508-514 :508-514
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
10008524
Abstract
Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is a microbial process that commonly occurs in anoxic aquatic environments. Byproducts of the process are hydrogen sulfide and carbonate alkalinity. Sulfate reduction in wetlands constructed to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) is desirable because hydrogen sulfide readily reacts with dissolved metals, precipitating them as sulfides, and alkalinity neutralizes drainage acidity. The U.S. Bureau of Mines is currently involved in several research projects that are exploring the utilization of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and metal sulfide formation processes for the treatment of coal mine drainage. This paper discusses factors that affect the importance of sulfide formation in aquatic systems and evaluates the theoretical potential of the process in wetlands constructed to treat AMD.
Publication Date
19890101
Document Type
OP;
Fiscal Year
1989
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
OP 36-91
NIOSH Division
PRC;
Source Name
Ch. 38B in Constructed Wetlands for Waste Water Treatment. Lewis Pub., Chelsea, MI, Pp 508-514
State
MI;
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