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Relationships between smoke and carbon monoxide and their implication toward improved mine fire detection.

Authors
Litton-CD
Source
Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference of Safety in Mines Research Institutes, September 11-15, 1989, Washington, DC. Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Mines, OFR 27-89, 1989 Sep; :77-82
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
10007242
Abstract
Tests were conducted to determine the relative levels of carbon monoxide (CO) and smoke produced from smoldering and flaming mine combustibles, including wood, coal, and conveyor belting. The data indicated that smoldering combustibles generate a very low level of CO compared to the level of smoke produced. Even though during flaming, the level of CO relative to that of smoke increases, it is found that a "typical" alarm level for smoke is comparable to a CO level of about 6 ppm. For smoldering the equivalent CO level is in the range of 2 ppm. The implications of these findings in regard to early warning mine fire detection are discussed. The overall results clearly indicate that developing mine fires can be detected earlier using smoke sensors rather than CO sensors.
Keywords
Mining; Mine fires; Mine gases; Carbon monoxide; Fire detection; Fire detection systems; Smoke detection; Smoke detectors
Publication Date
19890901
Document Type
OP; Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Fiscal Year
1989
NTIS Accession No.
PB89-225262
NTIS Price
A99
Identifying No.
OP 210-89
NIOSH Division
PRC
Source Name
Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference of Safety in Mines Research Institutes, September 11-15, 1989, Washington, DC
State
PA; DC
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