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Company Towns Versus Company Camps in Developing Alaska's Mineral Resources.

Authors
Bottge-RG
Source
BoM, 1986 :19 pages
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
10005493
Abstract
When a company develops a mineral property in a remote area of Alaska, it must consider how best to house its personnel. This Bureau of Mines report examines the economics of two optins: company towns and company camps. The price required to maintain a 15% discounted-cash-flow rate of return (dcfror) was derived for hypothetical 1,000-st/d cut-and-fill mines and 50,000-st/d open pit mines located in three different regions of the state. One set of hypothetical mines utilizes a townsite; the other utilizes a relatively new concept, a fly-in camp or commuting operation, in which two shifts of employees operate the mine and all associated facilities for 1 week before being replaced by a second crew. The study shows that operating costs were higher for mines employing the commuting option than for mines having a company town because of the additional wages paid for overtime hours; however, the price required to obtain a 15% DCfror for the single-product copper concentrate, f.O.B. The mill site, was significantly lower owing to the lower investment costs for the camp-type operation. The economic advantage for those mines utilizing the camp increases from south to north and from the coast toward the interior.
Keywords
Mineral-deposits; Open-pit-mining; Mineral-industries;
Publication Date
19860101
Document Type
IH; Information Circular;
Fiscal Year
1986
NTIS Accession No.
PB87-188900
NTIS Price
A03
Identifying No.
IC 9107
NIOSH Division
AFOC;
Source Name
Performer: Bureau of Mines, Juneau, Alaska. Alaska Field Operations Center.
State
AK;
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