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Relative importance of abrasion and corrosion in metal loss in ball mining.

Authors
Dodd-J; Dunn-DJ; Huiatt-JL; Norman-TE
Source
Miner Metall Process 1985 Nov; 2(4):212-216
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
10005063
Abstract
Corrosion studies in laboratory ball mills and grinding environment simulations produce corrosion rates and total metal removal rates much lower than those recorded in operating production ball mills. The corrosion component of ball metal loss in many mills probably represents less than 10% of the total loss, judging from Amax Inc. Experience and recent U.S. Bureau of Mines tests. Such small absolute losses are consistent with ball metal loss measured in production ball mill marked ball wear tests to determine effects of corrosion and abrasion resisting properties of alloys in operating mills. These indicate that metal hardness and microstructure determine relative metal loss rates of a given situation. The combination of ore characteristics and grinding process dynamics determine metal loss severity. Alloying for corrosion resistance and modification of the milling corrosion environment yield relatively small metal loss reductions. Alloying and heat treatment to produce high hardness and microstructures of high carbon martensite and, for cast irons m7c3 carbides, produce the lowest metal losses in typical wet grinding applications.
CODEN
MMPRE8
Publication Date
19851101
Document Type
OP; Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1986
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
OP 42-86
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0747-9182
NIOSH Division
SLRC
Source Name
Minerals & Metallurgical Processing
State
UT
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