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Geotechnical aspects of roof and pillar stability in a Georgia talc mine.

Authors
Moebs-NN; Sames-GP
Source
Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, RI 9404, 1992 Jan; :1-29
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
10001258
Abstract
The report summarizes a U.S. Bureau of Mines study on the application of geotechnology to identify and minimize ground control hazards in talc mining operations in northwest Georgia. The major ground control hazard is pillar sloughing attributed to the steeply dipping orientation of a pronounced foliation in the talc ore body. The sloughing problem, which gradually reduces the effective support area of a pillar through attrition, can be minimized by appropriate artificial support, as determined by a rock classification system, and by a more uniform pillar design. A boundary element model confirmed the advantages of using a uniform pillar design to avoid excessive loads on portions of irregular pillars. Instrumentation to measure roof convergence and pillar loading was installed at selected locations in an active talc mine but failed to detect any significant changes, suggesting that the gneiss hanging wall constitutes a strong roof that probably can support large spans between pillars and permit high extraction ratios. The interpretation also is supported by a rock classification of the hanging wall gneiss.
Keywords
Mining-engineering; Columns-supports; Roofs; Loads-forces; Engineering-geology; Underground-mining; Underground-supporting; Room-and-pillar-mining; Mining-geology; Talc
Publication Date
19920101
Document Type
Report of Investigations
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
PB92-186048
NTIS Price
A03
Identifying No.
RI-9404
NIOSH Division
PRC
Source Name
Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, RI 9404
State
PA
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