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Using sulfur hexafluoride as a gaseous tracer to study ventilation systems in mines.

Authors
Thimons-ED; Bielicki-RJ; Kissell-FN
Source
Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, RI 7916, 1974 Jan; :1-22
NIOSHTIC No.
10000741
Abstract
The Bureau of Mines found sulfur hexafluoride (sf6), released from a lecture bottle, to be an ideal gaseous tracer for studying mine ventilation systems. Air samples were collected in glass syringes and analyzed by electron-capture gas chromatography. In these studies, the lower limit of detection was about 1 part per billion by volume (ppb) of sf6 per part of air. Experiments conducted in a Pennsylvania limestone mine showed this technique useful in evaluating the effectiveness of auxiliary fans, measuring low flow velocities, probing the air circulating near a working face region where ventilation appeared to be poor, and estimating volumetric flow rates in airways of large cross-sectional area and having low flow velocities. This technique was also used in a western vein- type metal mine to measure the amount of return air being recirculated into the intake air due to leakage through old stoped areas.
Keywords
Mine-gases; Mining-industry; Methanes; Methane-drainage; Methane-control; Explosive-gases; Explosive-atmospheres; Underground-mining; Coal-mining; Control-technology; Engineering-controls
CAS No.
74-82-8
Publication Date
19740101
Document Type
IH; Report of Investigations
Fiscal Year
1974
NTIS Accession No.
PB-234052
NTIS Price
A03
Identifying No.
RI-7916
NIOSH Division
PRC
Source Name
Pittsburgh, PA: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, RI 7916
State
PA
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