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Lead hazard surveillance using an environmental reporting database.

Authors
Valiante-DJ; Rab-S; Stanbury-MJ
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg 1997 Nov; 12(11):769-772
NIOSHTIC No.
00239996
Abstract
The application of an environmental reporting database to lead (7439921) hazard surveillance was examined. Information concerning lead use was obtained from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Right to Know (DEP/RTK) survey completed in 1990 and 1992. A total of 655 companies reporting the use of lead which were not previously identified by the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS) Lead Registry, completed the NJDHSS lead use survey. For various reasons, occupational exposure to lead was no longer an issue in 326 companies. Insignificant lead use was determined in an additional 258 companies. These exclusions resulted in 71 companies with potential lead exposure. Of these 71 companies, 89% indicated that they were cognizant of the OSHA Lead Standard provisions. Information concerning airborne lead levels was provided to the NJDHSS by 70% of the companies. In all, 63% of the companies supplied actual air sampling data. Of the 50 companies providing air monitoring results, 4% had lead levels in excess of the OSHA permissible exposure limit of 50 micrograms per cubic meter. Air monitoring for lead was not conducted by 30% of the 71 companies. An on site evaluation by an NJDHSS industrial hygienist was conducted in eight of these companies. A potential lead exposure problem was identified in only one of the eight companies. A total of 31% of the 71 companies performed biological monitoring. In all 22 companies, blood lead levels were below 25 micrograms per deciliter. The authors conclude that lead hazard surveillance using data obtained directly from companies does not enhance the existing capabilities of laboratory based surveillance. The underreporting of elevated blood lead levels in workers does not appear to be a problem.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Cooperative-Agreement; Surveillance-programs; Occupational-exposure; Heavy-metals; Information-systems; Exposure-levels; Biological-monitoring; Blood-analysis; Exposure-limits; Occupational-health-programs; Air-quality-monitoring
CODEN
AOEHE9
CAS No.
7439-92-1
Publication Date
19971101
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
1998
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-CCU-208440
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
1047-322X
Source Name
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
State
NJ
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