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A study of workers in the Vermont granite industry: a prospective epidemiologic investigation.

Authors
Peters-JM; Fine-LJ; Burgess-WA; Theriault-GP; DiBerardinis-L
Source
Kresge Center for Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, 1973 Jan; :1-35
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00235390
Abstract
This study consisted of a prospective investigation of cohorts of granite shed workers, granite quarry workers, and marble workers studied in 1970 through 1972. There were 677 granite shed workers seen both in 1970 and in 1972. The granite quarry workers included 546 seen in 1970 and 532 seen in 1972. There were 107 marble workers seen in 1971 and 1972. A group of 344 workers from foundries and the talc industry was also studied to determine the effects of smoking on pulmonary function. The findings indicated that the prospective, follow up study confirms the results from an earlier cross sectional study. The annual decrement in pulmonary function appeared to be excessive in this population. There was a relationship between levels of dust exposure and rate of decline which cannot be accounted for by age, height or smoking. Smoking itself influenced the rate of decrement. Workers who have never smoked showed the least decrement, while current smokers showed the most. Heavy smokers had greater decrements than light smokers. No consistent relationship was found between X-ray opacities and rate of pulmonary function decrement.
Keywords
NIOSH-Contract; Contract-099-72-0066; Mineral-dusts; Dust-exposure; Respiratory-system-disorders; Pulmonary-function-tests; Occupational-exposure; Cigarette-smoking; Humans; Quarry-workers
Publication Date
19730101
Document Type
Final Contract Report
Funding Type
Contract
Fiscal Year
1973
NTIS Accession No.
PB97-151740
NTIS Price
A04
Identifying No.
Contract-099-72-0066
Priority Area
Respiratory-system-disorders
Source Name
Kresge Center for Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
State
MA
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