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An investigation of multiple biomarkers among workers exposed to styrene and styrene-7,8-oxide.

Authors
Rappaport-SM; Yeowell-O'Connell-K; Bodell-W; Yager-JW; Symanski-E
Source
Cancer Res 1996 Dec; 56(23):5410-5416
NIOSHTIC No.
00234920
Abstract
In this longitudinal study, the effects of styrene (100425) and styrene-7,8-oxide (96093) (SO) exposure were examined among 48 reinforced plastics workers. Blood, air, and exhaled air samples were collected from each worker. Among all subjects, the mean styrene exposure level was 64.3mg/m3, while the mean SO exposure level was 159 micrograms per cubic meter (microg/m3). The mean exhaled styrene concentration was 1.76mg/m3. The mean sister chromatid exchange (SCE) rate was 0.41 exchanges per cell. Mean albumin adduct levels ranged from 0.286 nanomoles per gram (nmol/g) of albumin to 1.68nmol/g. Mean DNA adduct levels were significantly higher among smokers than among nonsmokers. The mean SCEs among smokers, 6.73 per cell, were significantly higher than those among nonsmokers, 6.07 per cell. Classification according to job reduced the ranges of exposures and biomarkers. Styrene exposure was highly correlated with the exhaled styrene concentration, with a coefficient of 0.910. Styrene exposure was also correlated with SO exposure, with a coefficient of 0.327. Biomarker levels were significantly correlated with styrene and SO exposure. The correlation coefficients between DNA adduct levels and styrene exposure, albumin adduct levels and SO exposure, and SCEs and SO exposure were higher among nonsmokers than among smokers. When the coefficients were computed for specific jobs, the coefficients for SO exposure and SO biomarkers, 0.709 to 0.966, were higher than those for styrene exposure and SO biomarkers, 0.017 to 0.530. The main effects ratio of styrene to SO was calculated as 4.65x10(-4) micromoles of SO per micromole of styrene, indicating that SO exposure was the main cause of increased SO biomarkers. The authors conclude that decreases in SO exposure may be more crucial than decreases in styrene exposure to the reduction of the health hazards in the reinforced plastics industry.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Grants-other; Humans; Plastics-industry; Occupational-exposure; Biological-monitoring; Blood-analysis; DNA-adducts; Genotoxic-effects
Contact
Biomedical & Environ Hlth Scis University of California School of Public Health Berkeley, CA 94720
CODEN
CNREA8
CAS No.
100-42-5; 96-09-3
Publication Date
19961201
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
838959.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1997
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-02221
Issue of Publication
23
ISSN
0008-5472
Priority Area
Other Occupational Concerns; Grants-other
Source Name
Cancer Research
State
CA
Performing Organization
University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California
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