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Occupational and environmental factors and male infertility.

Authors
Schrader-SM
Source
Infertil Reprod Med Clin North Am 1992 Apr; 3(2):319-328
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00232452
Abstract
In a review of male reproductive chemical toxicity, the historical development, protocols for initiation of toxicant testing, procedures for obtaining reproductive profiles, toxicant sites of action and new diagnostic procedures were discussed. The availability of lists of reproductive toxicants, including the Genetox list and the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances, was cited. Contact addresses and phone numbers were provided for the National Toxicology Program, the Interagency Testing Committee, and NIOSH to nominate substances for testing. Procedures were described for the collection of semen. Recommended semen evaluation parameters included temperature, turbidity, color, liquefaction time, volume, osmolality, pH, sperm counts, viability and motility assessments. The use of a computer assisted sperm analysis system for the analysis of motility was described. The routine use of sperm morphometry analysis as a replacement of the sperm morphology analysis was cited. The optimal method for the assessment of toxicant effects on the neuroendocrine system was considered to be measurement of circulatory or excreted urinary hormone levels. Sperm count, morphology, and head morphometry, indicating status of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis, were described as indications of toxicant effects on the testes. Analyses of chemical markers, glycerylphosphorylcholine for epididymis, fructose for seminal vesicles, and zinc for prostrate, were recommended to determine the effects of toxicants on the accessory sex glands. Effects on sexual function were considered hardest to assess due to the personal nature of such inquiries. New methods in reproductive toxicant assessment included the sperm penetration assay and DNA stability assay. The author concludes that better reproductive toxicology testing will become available with the development of more sophisticated DNA analysis methods
Keywords
Sexual-reproduction; Reproductive-effects; Reproductive-hazards; Reproductive-system; Spermatozoa; Environmental-exposure; Fertility; Clinical-tests; Microscopic-analysis
CODEN
IRMCF8
Publication Date
19920401
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
2
ISSN
1047-9422
NIOSH Division
DBBS
Source Name
Infertility and Reproductive Medicine Clinics of North America
State
OH
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