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Immunologic methods for the detection of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Authors
Santella-RM; Gomes-M; Zhang-YJ; Young-TL; Perera-FJ
Source
Health Risk Assessment and Surveillance in the Industrial Setting, Symposium Proceedings, May 27-29, 1991, Tapei, Taiwan. 1992 Apr; :81-94
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00232202
Abstract
Immunologic methods for detecting exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were discussed. PAH biological monitoring research has focused on determining the concentrations of PAH/DNA and PAH/protein adducts. PAH/DNA adduction is of major interest since cellular DNA is the target of carcinogens. PAH/protein adducts are regarded as surrogates for PAH/DNA adduction. The focus of the research has been on developing methods for measuring DNA and protein adduction by benzo(a)pyrene (50328) (BaP), a prototype PAH. To detect BaP/DNA adducts, monoclonal and polyclonal antisera have been developed against benzo(a)pyrene-diol-epoxide (BPDE)/DNA. When used with an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), sensitivities on the order of one femtomole (fmol) have been obtained. The results of studies of PAH/DNA adducts in various occupationally and environmentally exposed populations were discussed. Studies in coke oven workers have found WBC BaP/DNA adduct concentrations ranging from 0.80 to 5.0 adducts per 10(7) nucleotides. The adduct levels were correlated with the levels of PAH exposure. Detecting BPDE/protein adducts was discussed. Hemoglobin and albumin have been used in studies of PAH/protein adduction. An assay utilizing a monoclonal antibody developed from animals immunized with BPDE/guanosine conjugated with bovine serum albumin has been developed. Studies of serum albumin adduction in coke oven workers have found PAH/albumin levels of 5.22fmol/microgram, versus 4.07fmol/microgram in unexposed persons. Urinary PAH excretion as a marker of exposure was discussed. Urinary excretion of PAHs by patients treated with coal-tar for psoriasis has been measured with an ELISA.
Keywords
NIOSH-Grant; Polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons; Biochemical-indicators; DNA-adducts; Immunochemistry; Hemoproteins; Risk-analysis; Dermatitis; Biological-monitoring; Coke-oven-workers; Occupational-exposure; Environmental-exposure
Contact
Environmental Sciences Columbia University 650 West 168Th Street New York, NY 10032
CAS No.
50-32-8
Publication Date
19920430
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings;
Funding Amount
651727
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-02622
Source Name
Health Risk Assessment and Surveillance in the Industrial Setting, Symposium Proceedings, May 27-29, 1991, Tapei, Taiwan
State
NY
Performing Organization
Columbia University New York, New York, New York
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