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Pesticide exposure during greenhouse applications. III. Variable exposure due to ventilation conditions and spray pressure.

Authors
Methner-MM; Fenske-RA
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg 1996 Mar; 11(3):174-180
NIOSHTIC No.
00232142
Abstract
The effectiveness of ventilation systems and application pressures in greenhouses was evaluated for their ability to protect workers from dermal and respiratory exposure to pesticides. Six workers were monitored with patch techniques and sampling of air during greenhouse gunning applications. Two application pressures (40 and 120 pounds/square inch) and three ventilation conditions (low velocity unidirectional, multidirectional, and no ventilation) were examined. A fluorescent whitening agent tracer was used as a surrogate for pesticides. Results clearly showed that an interaction between application pressure and ventilation condition occur during greenhouse handgunning applications. Mean total body, back, upper arm, and forearm dermal deposition rates increased significantly when application pressure was increased under unidirectional ventilation. The total body rate decreased significantly under multidirectional ventilation when application pressure increased. Tracer deposition rates during low pressure, unidirectional applications were significantly less than low pressure, no ventilation applications for all regions except the chest, upper legs, and lower legs. Deposition rates during multidirectional ventilation were significantly greater than the other ventilation conditions at either pressure except for the back at high pressure. At both application pressures, breathing zone contamination under unidirectional and multidirectional ventilation was three and four fold lower, respectively, than under no ventilation. Unidirectional ventilation reduced dermal and breathing zone contamination, whereas multidirectional ventilation increased dermal exposure but reduced breathing zone contamination. The authors conclude that careful characterization of both dermal and respiratory exposure is needed during greenhouse handgunning applications.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Grants-other; Skin-exposure; Air-sampling; Pesticide-residues; Gardeners; Ventilation-systems; Ventilation-equipment; Exhaust-ventilation
Contact
Environmental Sciences Rutgers University P O Box 231, Cook College New Brunswick, N J 08903
CODEN
AOEHE9
Publication Date
19960301
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
96655
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1996
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-K01-OH-00063
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
1047-322X
Priority Area
Other Occupational Concerns; Grants-other
Source Name
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
State
NJ
Performing Organization
Rutgers the State Univ New Brunswick, New Brunswick, New Jersey
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