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Serum perfluorooctanoic acid and hepatic enzymes, lipoproteins, and cholesterol: A study of occupationally exposed men.

Authors
Gilliland-FD; Mandel-JS
Source
Am J Ind Med 1996 May; 29(5):560-568
NIOSHTIC No.
00230709
Abstract
Associations between serum fluorine (7782414) concentrations and markers of hepatic function and serum cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations in workers occupationally exposed to perfluorooctanoic-acid (335671) (PFOA) were examined. The study group consisted of 115 men, mean age 39.3 years, employed at a chemical factory that produced PFOA and other specialty chemicals between 1985 and 1989. Forty eight subjects were in jobs such as production worker or maintenance worker that were considered to have high levels of PFOA exposure. The remaining subjects were in jobs thought to have no PFOA exposure. The subjects completed a medical history questionnaire. The questionnaire included questions on alcohol use and smoking. The subjects' height and weight were measured, from which body mass indices (BMIs) were computed. Venous blood samples were collected and analyzed for serum total fluorine, glutamyl-oxaloacetic-transaminase (SGOT), glutamyl-pyruvic- transaminase (SGPT), gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (HDL). Total fluorine concentrations ranged from 0 to 26 parts per million (ppm), mean 3.3ppm. The serum total fluorine concentrations were not significantly associated with serum cholesterol, LDL, or HDL concentrations. Alcohol consumption was significantly associated with higher HDL concentrations and age and BMI were significantly associated with cholesterol concentrations. Serum fluorine concentrations were significantly associated with HDL concentrations in moderate drinkers. SGOT, SGPT, an GGT were not significantly associated with serum fluorine concentration. In all subjects, the SGOT, SGPT, and GGT values were in the clinically acceptable range. No workers reported any signs or symptoms consistent with liver dysfunction. The authors conclude that occupational exposure to PFOA at these levels is not associated with clinical signs of hepatotoxicity.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Fluorine-compounds; Occupational-exposure; Chemical-industry-workers; Liver-enzymes; Serum-cholesterol; Biochemical-indicators; Liver-function; Training
Contact
Environmental Health University of Minnesota 1158 Mayo Memorial Minneapolis, Minn 55455
CODEN
AJIMD8
CAS No.
7782-41-4; 335-67-1
Publication Date
19960501
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
7317174
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1996
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T15-OH-007098; Grant-Number-T42-OH-007098
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0271-3586
Priority Area
Training
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
MN
Performing Organization
University of Minnesota of Mnpls-St Paul, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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