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Induction of micronucleated and multinucleated cells by glass fibers in cultured mammalian cells.

Authors
Whong-Z; Liu-Q; Robbins-S; Zhong-Z; Jones-WG; Ong-M
Source
Sixth US-Finnish Joint Symposium on Occupational Health and Safety, People and Work, Proceedings of the Sixth FIOH-NIOSH Joint Symposium on Occupational Health and Safety, 8-10 August 1995, Espoo, Finland. People and Work - Research Reports 3. H. Nordman, J. Starck, A. Tossavainen, E. Viikari-Juntura, eds. Helsinki, Finland: Finnish Institute of Occupational Health; 1995 Aug; :40-44
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00229720
Abstract
Studies were performed to determine the micronucleus inducing activity of glass fibers in-vitro in mammalian cells and characterize the possible mechanism of glass fiber induced micronuclei. The results demonstrated the micronucleus inducing activity of glass fibers. Both AAA-10 and JM-100 fibers induced micronucleus formation in V79 cells. The increase in the numbers of micronuclei was similar in both fiber types and was concentration related. Almost all the micronucleated cells induced by AAA-10 and JM 100 carried kinetochore (KC) positive micronuclei. The number of micronucleated cells which carried KC negative micronuclei was slightly higher in cultures treated with higher concentrations of glass fibers. The increase was not significantly different from the control. The data indicated that man made microfibers were able to induce micronucleated and multinucleated cells in cultured Chinese- hamster lung fibroblasts. Both microfibers induced similar frequencies of micronucleated cells with similar concentration related responses, which may be attributed to similarities in fiber size. Conversely, insulation fiber (ISL), composed of thicker and longer fibers, did not affect either cytogenetic end point. At present it is not clear whether V79 cells are able to phagocytize ISL; however, the authors conclude that glass fibers should be considered aneuploidogens which can pose genotoxic and potential carcinogenic risk to occupationally exposed individuals.
Keywords
Cytotoxic-effects; Cell-damage; Fiber-deposition; Cell-cultures; Risk-factors; Genotoxic-effects; Risk-analysis; In-vitro-study
Publication Date
19950101
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Nordman-H; Starck-J; Tossavainen-A; Viikari-Juntura-E
Fiscal Year
1995
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9789518021028
ISSN
1237-6183
NIOSH Division
DRDS
Source Name
Sixth US-Finnish Joint Symposium on Occupational Health and Safety, People and Work, Proceedings of the Sixth FIOH-NIOSH Joint Symposium on Occupational Health and Safety, 8-10 August 1995, Espoo, Finland. People and Work - Research Reports 3
State
WV
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