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Breath monitoring of inhalation and dermal methanol exposure.

Authors
Franzblau-A; Batterman-S; D'Arcy-JB; Sargent-NE; Gross-KB; Schreck-RM
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg 1995 Oct; 10(10):833-839
NIOSHTIC No.
00229634
Abstract
A study was conducted to determine the conditions under which breath measurements of methanol (67561) (MeOH) would be effective for the estimation of blood levels of MeOH after inhalation or dermal exposures in a work setting. Four human subjects were exposed to MeOH at concentrations of up to 800 parts per million (ppm) for 8 hours (hr). Exposures occurred at each concentration while at rest or while performing light exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Blood and breath samples were taken before and after 6 and 8hr of exposure. Eight subjects were dermally exposed by placing a hand in a large beaker of methanol for up to 16min. Blood and breath samples were analyzed for MeOH levels. Significant increases in blood and breath MeOH levels were seen after 6 and 8hr sedentary exposure to 400ppm MeOH. The mean MeOH concentration in breath were 72 and 77ppm after 6 and 8hr exposures compared to mean MeOH blood concentrations of 3 to 6ppm. The mean breath MeOH concentration dropped to about 10ppm 5min after end of exposure. Breath MeOH levels reached previous levels after reexposure to MeOH for 2hr. Breath MeOH concentration peaked 15min after cessation of dermal exposure, then declined rapidly between 15 and 30 after exposure, followed by a slower decrease thereafter. Blood MeOH concentration increased up to 45min after exposure, remained constant between 1 and 2hr after exposure before declining. Breath MeOH concentrations closely corresponded to predicted values using a blood/air partition coefficient after both inhalation and dermal exposure. Exposure of one hand in MeOH for 8min gave peak blood MeOH levels equivalent to inhalation exposure at the threshold limit value of 200ppm. The authors conclude that breath monitoring of MeOH exposure would require a 2hr waiting period after dermal exposure, representing a drawback in this method of monitoring.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Skin-exposure; Biological-monitoring; Blood-samples; Breathing-atmospheres; Inhalation-studies; Exposure-methods
Contact
Environmental & Indust Health University of Michigan 1420 Washington Heights Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029
CODEN
AOEHE9
CAS No.
67-56-1
Publication Date
19951001
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
363589.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1996
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-03024
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
1047-322X
Source Name
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
State
ME; MI
Performing Organization
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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