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The use of wrist monitors to quantify wrist movements.

Authors
Estill-CF; Grant-KA
Source
Sixth US-Finnish Joint Symposium on Occupational Health and Safety, People and Work, Proceedings of the Sixth FIOH-NIOSH Joint Symposium on Occupational Health and Safety, 8-10 August 1995, Espoo, Finland. People and Work - Research Reports 3. H. Nordman, J. Starck, A. Tossavainen, E. Viikari-Juntura, eds. Helsinki, Finland: Finnish Institute of Occupational Health; 1995 Aug; :142-145
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00229618
Abstract
The use of wrist monitors to quantify wrist movements was discussed and the need for quantifying wrist motions was considered with the respect to the epidemiological data on cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs). The quantification of wrist positions and repetitive movements is necessary to determine the cause of hand and wrist CTDs. Cinematographic methods have been widely used to study wrist postures and motions; however, these methods require the use of at least two cameras and are very time consuming. Accelerometer based motion recording systems (wrist monitors) and electrogoniometers represent alternative methods for quantifying wrist positions and movements. Using wrist monitors and electrogoniometers for quantitatively examining wrist movements was discussed. Wrist monitors are miniaturized battery powered systems that can be attached to the wrist or other body sites, and have the capability of continuously recording data for up to 30 days. An electrogoniometer can be regarded as a combination of a goniometer with a potentiometer. The major advantage of an electrogoniometer is that it can quantify three directions of wrist movement for wrist position, velocity, and acceleration; however, attachment and calibration can be time consuming. The size of an electrogoniometer can interfere with a worker's ability to perform his tasks. The authors conclude that either wrist monitors or electrogoniometers can be utilized to quantify wrist movements, with the choice depending on the detail of the required data and worksite flexibility.
Keywords
Cumulative-trauma-disorders; Biomechanics; Epidemiology; Repetitive-work; Monitoring-systems; Equipment-design; Electronic-devices; Quantitative-analysis; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders
Publication Date
19950801
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Nordman-H; Starck-J; Tossavainen-A; Viikari-Juntura-E
Fiscal Year
1995
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9789518021028
ISSN
1237-6183
NIOSH Division
DPSE; DBBS
Priority Area
Musculoskeletal-system-disorders
Source Name
Sixth US-Finnish Joint Symposium on Occupational Health and Safety, People and Work, Proceedings of the Sixth FIOH-NIOSH Joint Symposium on Occupational Health and Safety, 8-10 August 1995, Espoo, Finland. People and Work - Research Reports 3
State
OH
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