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Association of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (estimated from job category) with concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide in urine from workers at a steel plant.

Authors
Kang-D; Rothman-N; Cho-H; Lim-HS; Kwon-J; Kim-M; Schwartz-B; Strickland-PT
Source
Occup Environ Med 1995 Sep; 52(9):593-599
NIOSHTIC No.
00228914
Abstract
The relative contribution of occupation and smoking on urinary levels of 1-hydroxypyrene-glucuronide (1-OHPG) was examined in a group of steel facility workers in a modern steel production factory located in South Korea. Participating in the study were 44 employees who worked at jobs where there were increased levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the air. A control group of 40 workers was also studied. Job categories were assigned to workers according to the level of exposure to PAHs. A questionnaire was used to gather demographic data. Urine samples were analyzed for 1- OHPG via synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy after immunoaffinity chromatography specific for PAH metabolites. The mean 1-OHPG concentration in exposed workers was significantly increased compared with unexposed controls. A significant difference in log transformed 1-OHPG levels was noted between job categories. Mean 1- OHPG concentrations in the blast furnace and coke oven workers were significantly increased compared with workers in other job categories. A clear dose response relationship was noted between mean 1-OHPG concentrations and no or low, mid, and high PAH exposure strata in both the current smokers and the nonsmokers. An association was also noted between 1-OHPG concentrations and the quantity of cigarettes smoked among all workers or among no or low PAH exposed workers. The authors conclude that 1-OHPG is a common urinary metabolite in people with recent occupational exposure to PAHs and is associated both with job category and estimated level of PAH exposure.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; Epidemiology; Risk-factors; Risk-analysis; Urinalysis; Carcinogens; Steel-industry; Biological-monitoring; Polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons; Occupational-exposure
Contact
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205
CODEN
OEMEEM
Publication Date
19950901
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1995
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
9
ISSN
1351-0711
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Source Name
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
OH; MD
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