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Pesticide exposure during greenhouse applications, Part I. Dermal exposure reduction due to directional ventilation and work training.

Authors
Methner-MM; Fenske-RA
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg 1994 Aug; 9(8):560-566
NIOSHTIC No.
00225002
Abstract
A study of the effect of ventilation on applicator pesticide exposures in a commercial greenhouse was conducted. The study group consisted of nine workers employed at two commercial green houses in Florida. Four were experienced pesticide applicators and five were inexperienced. The greenhouses were ventilated by fans and louvers to provide unidirectional air flows of 5.2 meters per second. Each worker performed a simulated pesticide application by spraying a fluorescent tracer on the plants from a handgun for 0.67 to 1.2 hours. The ventilation systems were operating in some experiments and turned off in other experiments. The subjects were videotaped during the spraying operations. The extent of dermal deposition of the tracer was determined by analyzing the pattern of fluorescent spots on the videotapes and from the amount of tracer deposited on patches attached to the subject's arms and legs. Videotape analysis revealed that the upper arms were the least exposed region regardless of whether the ventilation system was turned on or off. Mean total deposition of the tracer on the bodies of the experienced applicators was decreased seven fold when the ventilation system was operating, compared to when it was not. Total body deposition of the inexperienced applicators was increased ten to 30 fold when the ventilation system was on compared to when it was off. The mean total deposition of the tracer was similar for the experienced and inexperienced applicators when the ventilation system was turned off. The decrease in tracer deposition observed on the experienced applicators when the ventilation system was on was due to their remaining upwind of the aerosol drift pattern. When the ventilation system was operating, the overall mean exposure decrease of the experienced applicators was 92%. The overall mean exposure of the inexperienced applicators increased by 40%. The authors conclude that pesticide applicators can employ strong unidirectional ventilation to their advantage by remaining upwind of the aerosol drift pattern when applying pesticides by handgun in greenhouses.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Author; NIOSH-Grant; Grants-other; Agricultural-chemicals; Occupational-exposure; Simulation-methods; Work-practices; Air-flow; Ventilation-systems; Skin-exposure; Agricultural-workers
Contact
Environmental Sciences Rutgers University P O Box 231, Cook College New Brunswick, N J 08903
CODEN
AOEHE9
Publication Date
19940801
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
96655.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1994
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-K01-OH-00063
Issue of Publication
8
ISSN
1047-322X
Priority Area
Other Occupational Concerns; Grants-other
Source Name
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
State
FL; NJ
Performing Organization
Rutgers the State Univ New Brunswick, New Brunswick, New Jersey
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