Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

The US prevalence of self-reported carpal tunnel syndrome: 1988 National Health Interview Survey data.

Authors
Tanaka-S; Wild-DK; Seligman-PJ; Behrens-V; Cameron-L; Putz-Anderson-V
Source
Am J Publ Health 1994 Nov; 84(11):1846-1848
NIOSHTIC No.
00223741
Abstract
The extent and distribution of carpal tunnel syndrome among United States (US) adults and the effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on jobs and daily life were described. One adult per household that had responded to the Occupational Health Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey were selected for an interview; there were 44,233 respondents. Carpal tunnel syndrome was divided into two groups, self reported and medically called. The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome amongst US workers that had ever worked was 1.55% and was higher among females. Race had the highest adjusted odds ratio followed by sex and age. Twenty two percent of recent workers had one or more days of hand discomfort in the last 12 months and 5.9% of these had self reported carpal tunnel syndrome. Among subjects with prolonged hand discomfort, 5.8% were diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome by a medical person. Individuals with medically called carpal tunnel syndrome experienced a median of 12 weeks of consecutive hand discomfort and had the highest percentage of sleep disturbances, missing work, changes in work activities, and changing jobs due to hand discomfort.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; Humans; Hand-injuries; Morbidity-rates; Health-survey; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Occupational-health; Worker-health; Racial-factors; Age-factors; Carpal-tunnel-syndrome; Cumulative-trauma-disorders;
CODEN
AJHEAA
Publication Date
19941101
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1995
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
0090-0036
Priority Area
Musculoskeletal-system-disorders
Source Name
American Journal of Public Health
TOP