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The effect of an alternate environment as a collection medium on the permeation characteristics of solid organics through protective glove materials.

Authors
Fricker-C; Hardy-JK
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 1994 Aug; 55(8):738-742
NIOSHTIC No.
00222913
Abstract
The effect of a different environment as a collection medium on the permeation characteristics of solid organic substances through protective glove materials was investigated. Permeation testing was carried out using nine solid chemicals: hydroquinone (123319) (HQ), phenol (108952) (PHE), p-nitrotoluene (99990) (pNT), camphor (76222) (CAM), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (121142) (DNT), p-dichlorobenzene (106467) (DCB), benzoquinone (106514) (BQN), naphthalene (91203) (NAP), and 4,6-dinitrocresol (534521) (DNC). Five glove materials evaluated were natural rubber latex, polyurethane (PU), polyvinylchloride (PVC), nitrile, and neoprene. A stainless steel permeation cell designed for use with solid permeants was described. A saline collection medium was used. Permeation testing consisted of sample collection, extraction, and analysis. Each solid/membrane exposure consisted of a disk placed in contact with the selected membrane, so that the saline that came into contact with the back of the membrane collected any permeated material. The effluent sample was extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography. Results showed that breakthrough time (BT) and steady state permeation rate (SSPR) were affected by saline as collection medium, compared to helium used in a previous study. Typically, BT values were slightly increased with saline. However, a dramatic increase in BT was seen with dichlorobenzene and neoprene (6.4 to 54.8 minutes (min)). For DNC, three glove materials exhibited response, while for PVC and latex, SSPRs were slightly above detection limits. Differences in SSPRs of the two collection media were explained on the basis of differences in polarities between the membranes and the solids. As membrane polarity increased, the difference between the helium and saline collection media also increased. Overall, natural rubber gave the poorest protection, and nitrile the best protection. The authors conclude that the saline method is comparable to the helium method, but that it yields longer BTs. The polarity of the glove material may be a factor that reduces permeation rate.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Grants-other; Analytical-methods; Body-protection; Occupational-exposure; Occupational-hazards; Protective-clothing; Protective-materials; Organic-chemicals
Contact
Chemistry University of Akron Department of Chemistry Akron, Ohio 44325
CODEN
AIHAAP
CAS No.
123-31-9; 108-95-2; 99-99-0; 76-22-2; 121-14-2; 106-46-7; 106-51-4; 91-20-3; 534-52-1
Publication Date
19940801
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
89051.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1994
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-02651
Issue of Publication
8
ISSN
0002-8894
Priority Area
Other Occupational Concerns; Grants-other
Source Name
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal
State
OH
Performing Organization
University of Akron, Akron, Ohio
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