Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Follow-up study of chrysotile asbestos textile workers: Cohort mortality and case-control analyses.

Authors
Dement-JM; Brown-DP; Okun-A
Source
Am J Ind Med 1994 Oct; 26(4):431-447
NIOSHTIC No.
00222767
Abstract
A previously studied cohort of white males employed in a Charleston, South Carolina asbestos textile factory was followed up for an additional 15 years; data on mortality in white female and black male workers were also analyzed. A nested case/control study was undertaken to examine possible differences in lung cancer exposure/response by textile operation. The predominant exposure at the facility was to chrysotile (12001295) asbestos. The possible confounding due to mineral-oil (8012951) exposures was also examined. Significant excess mortality was found among white male workers due to lung cancer, all causes of death, all cancers, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, pneumoconiosis and other respiratory diseases, and accidents. White females showed significant elevated mortality due to lung cancer, all causes of death, pneumoconiosis and other respiratory diseases, and other respiratory cancers. The black males showed significant elevated mortality for pneumoconiosis. A positive exposure/response relationship was determined for both lung cancer and pneumoconiosis. An increase in the relative risk of lung cancer was noted at 2 to 3% for the entire cohort for each fiber/cubic centimeter year of cumulative chrysotile exposure. For the white male workers this relation was the most consistent. The excess risk for lung cancer among white males and females appeared to occur at cumulative exposures lower than those for black males. Employment in preparation and carding operations was associated with a slightly reduced lung cancer risk. Working in the spinning and twisting activities was associated with a statistically significant increased lung cancer risk compared to other facility operations. Slightly longer fibers were found in spinning and twisting compared to other textile operations. Little effect of mineral-oil exposures was noted on the lung cancer exposure/response estimates. Two deaths were noted to be due to mesothelioma.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; Epidemiology; Cancer-rates; Asbestos-products; Textiles-industry; Textile-workers; Dust-exposure; Occupational-exposure; Respiratory-system-disorders; Lung-cancer; Sex-factors; Racial-factors
CODEN
AJIMD8
CAS No.
12001-29-5; 8012-95-1
Publication Date
19941001
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1995
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0271-3586
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
Priority Area
Respiratory-system-disorders
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
State
NC; OH
TOP