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Quantitative assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Authors
Gerr-F
Source
Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Emory University, 1994 Jan; :1-38
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00219222
Abstract
In an effort to assess the utility of vibrotactile threshold measurement for detecting carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among adult subjects, a cross sectional and longitudinal study was performed using adults with symptoms of hand discomfort. A control group was also selected. Statistically significant group differences were noted in almost all vibrotactile threshold outcomes between subjects with CTS and those without CTS. The sensitivity of vibrometry performed after 10 minutes of wrist flexion was approximately twice that obtained before wrist flexion for detecting electrophysiologically confirmed CTS. Vibrotactile threshold outcome measures derived from differences between the index and small finger provided better distinction between subjects with electrophysiologically confirmed CTS than did measures based on the index finger alone. Nonquantitative clinical tests used frequently for detecting CTS had excellent specificity when used among asymptomatic comparison subjects and poorer specificity when used in a comparison group with hand pain. The authors suggest that these findings allow rational application of vibrometry in studies of CTS.
Keywords
NIOSH-Grant; Humans; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Diagnostic-techniques; Carpal-tunnel-syndrome; Cumulative-trauma-disorders
Contact
Community Medicine Mount Sinai School of Medicine One Gustave L Levy Place New York, NY 10029
Publication Date
19940118
Document Type
Final Grant Report
Funding Amount
161973
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1994
NTIS Accession No.
PB94-175106
NTIS Price
A04
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-K01-OH-00098
NIOSH Division
OEP
Priority Area
Musculoskeletal-system-disorders
Source Name
Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Emory University
State
NY
Performing Organization
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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