Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

A biomechanical and ergonomic evaluation of patient transferring tasks.

Authors
Garg-A; Owen-B
Source
Designing for Everyone, Proceedings of the Eleventh Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, Paris, 1991. Queinnec Y, Daniellou F, Chapon A, eds., London: Taylor and Francis, 1991 Sep; 1(200-86-2923):60-62
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00214589
Abstract
A biomechanical and ergonomic study of patient transferring tasks was conducted. The study group consisted of six female nursing students who evaluated five different manual techniques and three mechanical hoists for transferring a patient between a wheelchair and toilet. The manual techniques consisted of lifting the patient using two persons, gently rocking and pulling the patient with a gait belt and walking belt using two persons, and pulling the patient with a walking belt and a Medesign belt using one person. The mechanical hoists consisted of the Hoyer Lift, Trans-aid, and Ambulift. After each session, the subjects rated the perceived level of stress in the shoulder, upper and lower back, and whole body, their degree of comfort, and feeling of security. Body angles during the transfers were determined from analyses of videotapes. Pulling forces exerted on the belts were determined in a separate experiment by attaching force dynamometers to the belts. The force and body angle data were used in a three dimensional biomechanical model to calculate compressive forces on the L5/S1 intervertebral disk during the manual transfers. Pulling forces exerted during the one and two person pulling transfers averaged about 77 and 39% of those required for manual lifting, respectively. Mean spinal compression forces occurring during the pulling transfers ranged from 1974 to 2745 newtons (N), versus 4800N for manual lifting. Lifting was perceived as being the most stressful and pulling with the walking belt the least stressful. Among the mechanical hoists, the Ambulift was rated to be the least stressful and the Hoyer lift the most stressful. The two person walking belt was perceived as being the most comfortable and secure. Manual lifting was rated as being least comfortable and secure. The Ambulift was rated as being the most comfortable and secure hoist. The authors conclude that the two person walking belt and the Ambulift seem to be the least stressful and most secure techniques for transferring patients between wheelchairs and toilets.
Keywords
NIOSH-Contract; Contract-200-86-2923; Manual-lifting; Health-care-personnel; Work-analysis; Safety-research; Ergonomics; Biomechanics; Skeletal-stress
Publication Date
19910901
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Queinnec-Y; Daniellou-F; Chapon-A
Funding Type
Contract
Fiscal Year
1991
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISBN No.
9780748400454
Identifying No.
Contract-200-86-2923
Source Name
Designing for Everyone, Proceedings of the Eleventh Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, Paris, 1991, Vol. 1
State
WI
Performing Organization
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
TOP