Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Mortality of workers hired during World War II.

Authors
Steenland-K
Source
Am J Ind Med 1993 May; 23(5):823-827
NIOSHTIC No.
00214464
Abstract
Mortality among United States (US) industrial workers hired during World War-II was studied to test the hypothesis that US male workers hired during World War-II were more unhealthy than those who entered military service and would not show the typical healthy worker effect. Three cohorts consisting of 8,049 males hired before 1940 (pre World War-II), 13,276 males hired between 1940 and 1944 (World War-II), and 19,842 males hired between 1945 and 1954 (post World War-II) were assembled from NIOSH studies of workers in the automobile, leather, paper and pulp production, shipbuilding, and chemical industries. The cohorts were followed until the end of 1989 and mortality was reviewed. Standard mortality ratios (SMRs) for total mortality and mortality from all cancers, lung cancer, ischemic heart disease, stroke, rheumatic heart disease, nonmalignant respiratory disease from external causes, alcoholism, cirrhosis, and diabetes were computed using mortality rates for the US general male population as the reference. Mortality from all causes and most specific causes were similar in the three cohorts. Mortality from nonmalignant respiratory disease tended to increase with year of hire; however, all SMRs were below 1. The author concludes that the study does not support the hypothesis that workers hired during World War-II were less healthy than those hired before or after the war.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; Epidemiology; Mortality-data; Worker-health; Occupational-medicine; Health-survey; Chemical-industry-workers; Shipyard-workers; Industrial-factory-workers
CODEN
AJIMD8
Publication Date
19930501
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1993
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
0271-3586
Source Name
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
TOP