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NIOSH Testimony on Occupational Exposure to Methylene Chloride by J. D. Millar, September 21, 1992.

Authors
NIOSH
Source
NIOSH 1992 Sep:19 pages
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00214128
Abstract
This testimony indicated that the present 500 part per million permissible exposure limit for methylene-chloride (75092) is not adequate to protect worker health, and supported the attempts of OSHA to lower the standard. Laboratory animal studies have indicated the carcinogenic potential of the compound. Three areas of concern related to the pharmacokinetics section of the OSHA proposed rule were discussed: unproven mechanistic assumptions made in physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling; the impact of the variability in human metabolic parameters on the risk estimates; and the interpretation of a recent mechanistic study relevant to methylene-chloride risk assessment. Also discussed in this testimony were central nervous system health effects (short term exposure limit and prolonged neurobehavioral effects), studies of workers exposed to methylene-chloride, indirect evidence related to cardiovascular risk, estimates of carboxyhemoglobin levels in relation to methylene-chloride exposure, comparisons between the results of the animal and epidemiologic studies, exposure monitoring, control technology, respiratory protection and other protective clothing and equipment. NIOSH recommends that the exposure limit be reduced to the lowest feasible level.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; NIOSH-Testimony; Millar-J-D; Neurotoxic-effects; Carcinogens; Laboratory-animals; Risk-factors; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Chlorinated-hydrocarbons; Comparative-toxicology;
CAS No.
75-09-2;
Publication Date
19920921
Document Type
Testimony;
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
PB93-215176
NTIS Price
A03
Priority Area
Neurotoxic Disorders; Neurotoxic-effects;
Source Name
NIOSH, 19 pages, 33 references
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