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Pharmacologic studies of wool dust extract in isolated guinea pig trachea.

Authors
Schachter-EN; Zuskin-E; Mustajbegovic-J; Buck-MG; Maayani-S; Marom-Z; Goswami-SK; Rienzi-N
Source
Cotton dust: proceedings of the Sixteenth Cotton Dust Research Conference, beltwide cotton conferences, January 9-10, 1992, Nashville, Tennessee. Domelsmith LN, Jacobs RR, Wakelyn PJ, eds. Memphis, TN: The National Cotton Council of America, 1992 Jan; :290-291
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00211841
Abstract
The pharmacologic properties of an aqueous wool dust extract were studied in-vitro. The extract was prepared by incubating 1 gram wool dust obtained from carding machines in a Yugoslavian wool mill with sterile water for 24 hours at 4 degrees-C. Tracheal rings prepared from male Hartley-albino-guinea-pigs were incubated with 0, 10, 30, 100, 300, or 1000 microliters of the aqueous extract in the presence or absence of 10 micromolar (microM) pyrilamine, 1microM atropine or indomethacin, 10microM LY-171883, BW-755C, or verapamil, or 1microM TMB-8 for 20 minutes. The contractile responses were measured and compared with those induced by 10(-5) molar carbachol. The wool dust extract caused a dose related increase in tracheal muscle contractility. The maximum response was 57.9% of that induced by carbachol. Pyrilamine, verapamil, and TMB-8 significantly inhibited the contractile responses to the wool dust extract. LY-171883 and BW-755C significantly enhanced the response. Atropine and indomethacin had no effect. The authors conclude that the wool dust extract induces contractile activity in isolated guinea-pig tracheal rings. The dose response resembles that seen previously for cotton dust. High concentrations of arachidonic-acid inhibitors such as LY-171883 and BW-755C enhance the response. Calcium channel blockers and antagonists such as verapamil and TMB-8 inhibit the response. These findings suggest that wool dust does not cause bronchoconstriction by altering mediator receptors as is the case with cotton dust, but may do so by affecting arachidonic- acid or other cellular metabolic pathways.
Keywords
NIOSH-Grant; Pulmonary-system-disorders; In-vitro-studies; Muscle-contraction; Wools; Organic-dusts; Airway-obstruction; Drugs; Physiological-chemistry; Laboratory-animals; Dose-response
Contact
Medicine Mount Sinai Medical Center One Gustave L Levy Place New York, N Y 10029
Publication Date
19920101
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Editors
Domelsmith-LN; Jacobs-RR; Wakelyn-PJ
Funding Amount
709316
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-02593
Priority Area
Pulmonary-system-disorders
Source Name
Cotton dust: proceedings of the Sixteenth Cotton Dust Research Conference, beltwide cotton conferences, January 9-10, 1992, Nashville, Tennessee
State
TN; NY
Performing Organization
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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