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Inhaled toxic agents: an evaluation of dose.

Authors
Hanna-LM
Source
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Hygiene and Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 1992 Jul; :1-104
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00211765
Abstract
A mathematical model was developed for the absorption of gases or vapors in the respiratory tract for use in determining the dose of inhaled gases and vapors to the airways of an individual and to extrapolate doses from animals to human subjects. The physical and chemical properties of the gas or vapor determine its absorption and must be considered in extrapolation between species. The method developed depends on determining the dimensions of the airspace surrounding each turbinate and assumes the airspace is geometrically similar to an annulus or a duct. The method may be used to quantify regional variability in airway dimensions of a population. Casted models of air passages made from cadavers were also studied and found to differ significantly from those of living human subjects. The extrapolations made using these cadaver models may not accurately reveal the flow and deposition rates found in living persons. Measurements which were made from hand traced images of airway dimensions were significantly different from measurements made with an image analyzer in which the digital data containing the scanned images were downloaded to the analyzer.
Keywords
NIOSH-Grant; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Pulmonary-system; Nasal-cavity; Airway-resistance; Inhalation-studies; Mathematical-models
Contact
Environmental Health Sciences Johns Hopkins University 615 N Wolfe Street Baltimore, MD 21205
Publication Date
19920707
Document Type
Final Grant Report
Funding Amount
94756
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
PB93-160877
NTIS Price
A07
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-K01-OH-00067
NIOSH Division
OEP
Priority Area
Pulmonary-system-disorders
Source Name
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Hygiene and Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
State
MD
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
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