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Morphologic, biochemical, and cytogenetic studies of bone marrow and circulating blood cells in painters exposed to ethylene glycol.

Authors
Cullen-MR; Solomon-LR; Pace-PE; Buckley-P; Duffy-TP; McPhedran-P; Kelsey-KT; Redlich-CA
Source
Environ Res 1992 Oct; 59(1):250-264
NIOSHTIC No.
00211615
Abstract
The effects of exposure to ethylene glycol ethers on bone marrow and circulating red blood cells were examined in shipyard painters. Painters in a shipyard were divided into three groups based upon changes seen in an early study of the same group of workers. The first group consisted of painters who had shown abnormal blood counts previously, the second group contained exposed painters with normal blood counts, and the third was a referent group of unexposed men. In the current study, subjects were interviewed and provided blood samples. No differences between groups were seen in the Coombs test, hemoglobin electrophoresis, hemoglobin-A(2) and hemoglobin-F levels, osmotic fragility, serum ferritin, B12 and folate levels, liver, renal and thyroid function tests, zinc-protoporphyrin levels, bone marrow histology and cellularity, genetic abnormalities, or most red cell enzymes and metabolites. Subjects in the first group had decreased pyruvate-kinase levels compared with the other groups, and exposed workers had changes suggestive of riboflavin deficiency or impaired riboflavin metabolism.
Keywords
Blood-analysis; Toxic-effects; Occupational-exposure; Blood-cells; Shipyard-workers; Ethylenes; Organic-solvents; Glycol-ethers
CODEN
ENVRAL
Publication Date
19921001
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
162000
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1993
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-K01-OH-00110
Issue of Publication
1
ISSN
0013-9351
NIOSH Division
OD
Priority Area
Cancer
Source Name
Environmental Research
State
MA
Performing Organization
Harvard University, School of Public Health, Occupational Health Program, Boston, Massachusetts
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