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Particle size distribution of automobile paint sprays.

Authors
Brosseau-LM; Fang-CP; Snyder-C; Cohen-BS
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg 1992 Sep; 7(9):607-612
NIOSHTIC No.
00210447
Abstract
A study of particle size distributions in automobile paint spray aerosols was conducted. Aerosol samples were collected from workers and test stands during base coat and clear coat automobile body spray painting operations using six and four stage personal impactors. The particle size distributions were calculated from the impactor data using a computerized procedure. Additional impactor samples were analyzed for xylene (1330207), a marker for solvent contained in the deposited particles. Test stand and personal sampling for xylene vapor were also performed using plain or charcoal sorbent tubes fitted with fiber glass prefilters (F-CSTs) or diffusion monitors. The geometric mean aerodynamic diameters of aerosols collected during the base coat operations ranged from 20 to 40 microns. The standard deviations varied from 2 to 3 microns. Determinations of particle size distribution during the clear coat operations were generally unsuccessful due to difficulties in obtaining enough mass on the impactor substrates. Xylene was not detected in any of the impactor substrates. Mean xylene vapor concentrations measured by the diffusion monitors, plain sorbent tubes, and the F-CSTs were 12.3, 12.8, and 15.0 milligrams per cubic meter, respectively. The authors conclude that aerosols generated by automobile manual spray painting operations are large and polydisperse. Although no solvent was found on the impactor substrates, any solvent on inhaled or deposited paint droplets will probably be absorbed by the respiratory tissues. Because of the large sizes of the spray droplets, most of the penetrating droplets will probably be deposited in the nasal passages and upper airways. The authors state that to properly assess exposure, both the particle and vapor components of a paint spray aerosol should be measured. F-CSTs are recommended for monitoring solvent vapor exposures.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Training; Aerosol-particles; Industrial-hygiene; Paint-spraying; Automotive-industry; Organic-solvents; Aromatic-hydrocarbons; Occupational-exposure
Contact
Community Medicine MT Sinai School of Medicine Fifth Avenue and 100Th Street New York, N Y 10029
CODEN
AOEHE9
CAS No.
1330-20-7
Publication Date
19920901
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
8639931.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T15-OH-07125
Issue of Publication
9
ISSN
1047-322X
Source Name
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
State
NY
Performing Organization
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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