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Continued need for strategies to prevent needlestick injuries and occupational exposures to bloodborne pathogens.

Authors
Martin-LS; Hudson-CA; Strine-PW
Source
Scand J Work, Environ & Health 1992 Jun; 18(Suppl 2):94-96
NIOSHTIC No.
00209456
Abstract
Of all the possible risks to health care workers for the occupational transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), being stuck with a contaminated needle and sharp objects poses the most serious risk. The risk of infection with HIV following one needlestick exposure to blood from a patient known to be infected was estimated to be approximately 0.3%. The corresponding figure for hepatitis-B virus was 6 to 30%. At the close of December in 1991, the Centers for Disease Control was aware of 28 cases where health care workers had seroconverted to HIV following an occupational exposure to HIV infected blood. Of these 28 cases, 12 were laboratory workers, 11 were nurses, three were physicians, and two were employed in other health care occupations. Other persons routinely exposed to infectious agents included fire and rescue workers, ambulance personnel, and law or correctional officers. Devices have been developed to prevent or reduce the risk of needlestick injury, including resheathing syringes and needleless intravenous systems. Preventive strategies were discussed.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; Health-care-personnel; Needlestick-injuries; Accident-prevention; Infection-control; Infectious-diseases; AIDS-virus; Viral-infections; Occupational-exposure
CODEN
SWEHDO
Publication Date
19920601
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
ISSN
0355-3140
Source Name
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
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