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1-pyrenol: a biomarker for occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Authors
Tolos-WP; Shaw-PB; Lowry-LK; MacKenzie-BA; Deng-F; Markel-HL
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg 1990 May; 5(5):303-309
NIOSHTIC No.
00205196
Abstract
A study of urinary 1-pyrenol excretion in workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was conducted to determine if pyrenol, a metabolite of pyrene (129000), could be used as a biomarker of occupational exposure to pyrene and PAHs. The cohort consisted of 28 persons, 26 males, who worked in the anode bake area of a factory producing anodes for aluminum reduction from liquid pitch and coke. Urine samples collected from two factory employees not working in the anode bake area and from 21 persons not exposed to PAHs were used for comparison. Urine samples were collected before and after a work shift on Monday and Wednesday of a work week and analyzed for pyrenol by high performance liquid chromatography. Breathing zone samples were collected and analyzed for pyrene, coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPVs), and 17 PAHs. Overshift urine pyrenol excretion increased by 0.106 micromole per mole (micromol/mol) in the comparisons and 1.944micromol/mol in the exposed workers. Preshift pyrenol concentrations were similar for workers working the first shift on both sampling days. The Wednesday preshift urine pyrenol concentrations were significantly higher than the Monday preshift values in workers working the second shift. Urinary pyrenol excretion was not significantly associated with smoking status. Breathing zone CTPV concentrations ranged from below the limit of detection to 0.6 milligram per cubic meter, pyrene concentrations from 1.21 to 7.44 micrograms per cubic meter (microg/m3), and total PAH concentrations from 9.5 to 94.6microg/m3. Overshift increases in urinary pyrenol excretion in the exposed workers were significantly associated with breathing zone pyrene and total PAH concentrations but not CTPV concentrations. The authors conclude that urinary pyrenol excretion can be used as a marker of occupational exposure to pyrene and PAHs.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; Industrial-hygiene; Urinalysis; Metabolites; Polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons; Industrial-factory-workers; Coal-tar-pitch; Chromatographic-analysis; Biological-monitoring; Occupational-exposure
CODEN
AOEHE9
CAS No.
129-00-0
Publication Date
19900501
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1990
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
5
ISSN
1047-322X
Source Name
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
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