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The impact of boundary layer separation on local exhaust design and worker exposure.

Authors
George-DK; Flynn-MR; Goodman-R
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg 1990 Aug; 5(8):501-509
NIOSHTIC No.
00204827
Abstract
The phenomenon of boundary layer separation, an important factor in determining a worker's breathing zone concentration, was investigated. Flow visualization and tracer gas studies were conducted in a wind tunnel using a mannequin. The mannequin's breathing zone concentration was estimated using a simple conceptual model based on mass transport by vortex shedding. An empirical model which relates the measured concentration to the distance from the source to the breathing zone for the situation when the contaminant is released downstream in a uniform flow was developed. The results suggested that in situations where a worker is immersed in a uniform flow, a higher level of control may be achieved by standing to the side of the workpiece rather than with the back to the flow. The authors also suggest that caution should be displayed when extrapolating to real life situations.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Control-technology; Exhaust-ventilation; Airborne-particles; Industrial-factory-workers; Breathing-zone; Toxic-materials; Air-contamination; Smoke-inhalation; Industrial-ventilation
Contact
Environmental Sciences & Engr University of North Carolina Rosenau Hall 201H Chapel Hill, NC 27514
CODEN
AOEHE9
Publication Date
19900819
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
113206
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1990
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-002392
Issue of Publication
8
ISSN
1047-322X
Priority Area
Control-technology
Source Name
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
State
NC
Performing Organization
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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