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Glove permeation by semiconductor processing mixtures: predicted and experimental results.

Authors
Zellers-ET
Source
Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 1991 Oct; :1-123
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00203286
Abstract
A series of investigations of solvent permeation through clothing designed to offer protection against contact with hazardous chemicals was conducted. Variables studied included solvent type, glove type, temperature, exposure profile, mixtures of solvents, and post exposure thermal decontamination. The highest level of permeation resistance to the photoresists and related formulations containing glycol ether derivatives either in neat form or in mixtures with other solvents was generally provided by butyl rubber gloves. Nitrile rubber gloves also provided a high level of protection, but increased temperature or repeated exposures compromised their barrier properties. Gloves composed of natural rubber or blends of natural rubber with other polymers were less effective against the neat solvents and photoresist formulations. Permeation of the glycol ether derivatives in the formulations was faster for most glove samples than had been predicted based on the permeation behavior of the pure glycol ethers. Use of thin surgical type gloves composed of natural rubber or polyvinyl-chloride beneath the chemically protective gloves increased the net permeation resistance marginally. Use of these gloves alone offered no effective permeation resistance. Even at temperatures as high as 50 degrees-C, butyl rubber gloves provided exceptionally good resistance to permeation. The decrease in permeation resistance was due to increases in the rates of diffusion rather than to increases in solubility.
Keywords
NIOSH-Grant; Control-technology; Protective-clothing; Semiconductors; Organic-solvents; Hand-protection; Electronics-industry; Electronic-devices; Hazardous-materials; Personal-protective-equipment
Contact
Environmental & Indust Health University of Michigan 109 S Observatory Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029
Publication Date
19911001
Document Type
Final Grant Report
Funding Amount
23834
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1992
NTIS Accession No.
PB92-136175
NTIS Price
A07
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R03-OH-02667
NIOSH Division
OEP
Priority Area
Control-technology
Source Name
Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
State
MI
Performing Organization
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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