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The presence of urinary cellular sediment and albuminuria in newspaper pressworkers exposed to solvents.

Authors
Hashimoto-DM; Kelsey-KT; Seitz-T; Feldman-HA; Yakes-B; Christiani-DC
Source
J Occup Med 1991 Apr; 33(4):516-526
NIOSHTIC No.
00199858
Abstract
The relationship between urinary cellular sediment and albuminuria and organic solvent exposures in newspaper pressworkers was examined. The study was the result of subjective reports of six cases of red urine among pressroom workers at a large newspaper publishing company (SIC-2711). The cohort consisted of 212 white males, mean age 44.6 years, employed as pressroom workers at two facilities of a large newspaper. The comparisons consisted of 33 white male compositers, mean age 54.2 years. Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for naphthas and glycol ethers. Urine samples were collected and analyzed for sugar, albumin, occult blood, nitrites, leukocytes, bile, and urobilinogen. Breathing zone total naphtha concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 105mg/m3. Glycol ether concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 2.6mg/m3. The pressroom workers had increased prevalences of leukocyturia or leukocyturia plus erythrocyturia (urinary cellular sediment) that could be related to increasing use of certain solvents. Analgesic use was negatively correlated with the occurrence of leukocyturia or urinary cellular sediment. Thirty two pressroom workers had albuminuria versus none of the comparisons. The prevalence of albuminuria was significantly associated with increasing use of solvent type-I, two glycol ether solvents, and kerosene (8008206). Workers with urinary cellular sediment were significantly more likely to have detectable albuminuria. The authors suggest that newspaper pressroom workers have a significantly elevated risk of urinary cellular sediment that is associated with increasing frequency of use of certain solvent mixtures.
Keywords
JOCMA7; NIOSH-Author; Publishing-and-printing; Hydrocarbons; Newspapers; Organic-solvents; Urogenital-system-disorders; Urinalysis; Blood-cells; Questionnaires; Glycols; Occupational-exposure
CODEN
JOCMA7
CAS No.
8008-20-6
Publication Date
19910401
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1991
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0096-1736
SIC Code
2711
Source Name
Journal of Occupational Medicine
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