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Proposed national strategies for the prevention of leading work-related diseases and injuries - disorders of reproduction.

Authors
NIOSH
Source
NIOSH 1988 Jan; :1-33
NIOSHTIC No.
00197146
Abstract
The many observable dysfunctions classified as disorders of reproduction include infertility, impotence, menstrual difficulties, spontaneous abortion, low birth weight, birth defects, congenital mental retardation, and various genetic diseases. Only 30 to 40 chemical, physical, and biological agents are generally recognized as human teratogens. An estimated 560,000 infant deaths, stillbirths, and recognized spontaneous abortions occur in the United States annually. Proving a causal association between workplace conditions and reproductive health is extremely difficult. A growing number of reports are appearing that evaluate semen quality in occupational groups. In several instances where disorders of reproduction were suspected in a workplace, no etiologic agent was immediately apparent. Several areas where research in this topic is needed are noted. Various surveillance and epidemiological conclusions are discussed along with control technologies and plans for action. The proposed strategic efforts to prevent reproductive disorders covers the following areas: public policy; laboratory research; surveillance and epidemiology; control strategies; public information and education programs; and professional information and education programs.
Keywords
Reproductive-hazards; Testes; Menstrual-disorders; Reproductive-system-disorders; Occupational-health-programs; Spermatogenesis; Industrial-health-programs; Occupational-safety-programs; Disease-prevention
Publication Date
19880101
Document Type
Numbered Publication
Fiscal Year
1988
NTIS Accession No.
PB90-167487
NTIS Price
A04
Identifying No.
(NIOSH) 89-133
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
OH
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