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Employment status and the frequency and causes of burn injuries in New England.

Authors
Rossignol-AM; Locke-JA; Burke-JF
Source
J Occup Med 1989 Sep; 31(9):751-757
NIOSHTIC No.
00192221
Abstract
This study assessed the effects of work and employment status on rates and causes of burn injuries and identified high risk occupations using 1978/1979 New England Regional Burn Program data for persons at least 20 years old. Overall, 30 percent of burns were work related. Burn incidence rates were 28.5 and 5.4 burns/100,000 person years for employed men and women, respectively. Burn rate ratios varied inversely with age, burn incidence rate was highest for employed men aged 20 to 24 years (46.5 burns/100,000 person years). Overall, 55 and 30 percent of burns to employed men and women, respectively, occurred at work. Burn rates were roughly three times higher for blacks versus whites and varied minimally with sex, employment status, or work status. Non work related burns were substantially higher for unemployed versus employed persons among both sexes and both races. Overall burn rates were highest in Maine, primarily due to high work related burn rates, and lowest in Rhode Island for both sexes. Scalds were the most common type of work related burn to men and women aged 20 to 54 years but flame or flash burns were most common for older persons. Explosion or ignition of flammable liquids caused most work related flame or flash burns. Food preparation or consumption and motor vehicles also accounted for the majority of work related burns. Male and female operatives, laborers, and service workers were over represented among work related burns. The authors indicate that several commonly held ideas regarding burn epidemiology and control need to be reassessed.
Keywords
JOCMA7; NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Traumatic-injuries; Humans; Accident-rates; Accident-statistics; Occupational-accidents; Age-factors; Racial-factors; Sex-factors; Mechanics; Risk-analysis; Food-handlers; Food-processing-workers; Occupational-hazards
Contact
Civil Engineering Tufts University Department of Civil Engr Medford, MA 02155
CODEN
JOCMA7
Publication Date
19890901
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
61398.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1989
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-02241
Issue of Publication
9
ISSN
0096-1736
Source Name
Journal of Occupational Medicine
State
ME; RI; MA
Performing Organization
Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts
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