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Standards: substance and issues.

Authors
Lynch-JR
Source
Transactions of the Thirty-Seventh Annual Meeting of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, May 31-June 6, 1975, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Cincinnati, OH: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, 1975 May; :160-163
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00190450
Abstract
The writing of regulations was discussed from a technical point of view, including the problem of consistency, and some of the main issues in the substance of standards themselves. Regulations must be written to meet the requirements of the court with clear, concise language. The regulations must be interpretable by the compliance officer. Lastly, the regulations must be understood by both the employer and the employee. For regulations to have consistency, there must be some logical scheme to their creation. Part of the input involves knowledge of the physical and toxicological properties of the substances to which exposure may occur. Often there are gaps in knowledge at this point. Issues which arise include those occurrences when exposures are occurring at the workplace are below the allowable levels. The obligations of the employer in this case are unclear. The decision as to where in a facility to take the measurements and just which employees to monitor are difficult ones. The frequency with which determinations are made and the length of the sampling period must also be considered in planning a monitoring situation. Also of importance and somewhat difficult is the decision as to what information should be given to which employees, and which employees should be a part of a medical screening program or a biological monitoring safety study. The problem of convincing individuals to participate in some studies is difficult because they fear that if they do not pass the medical part of the examination, they may find themselves out of a job. Since the Occupational Safety and Health Act does not provide for job protection for the workers, some do refuse to participate in work related studies.
Keywords
Occupational-health-programs; Occupational-safety-programs; Legislation; Worker-health; Safety-research; Accident-prevention; Accident-analysis; Education
Publication Date
19750531
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Fiscal Year
1975
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
NIOSH Division
OD
Source Name
Transactions of the Thirty-Seventh Annual Meeting of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, May 31-June 6, 1975, Minneapolis, Minnesota
State
OH; MN
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