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An Investigation of the Effects of External Supports on Manual Lifting.

Authors
Amendola-AA
Source
Dissertation, Industrial Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, 1989 May:112 pages
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00189608
Abstract
This study was conducted to assess the utility of the use of external support devices for manual lifting. Two commercially available devices, an airbelt and a compvest, and a combination of the two devices were tested in a lifting experiment for three frequencies of lift, three, six, and nine lifts per minute, using 20 male university student volunteers. The lifts were also performed with no device. The subjects lifted a tote box containing steel and lead shot from the floor to Metacarpal-III height at various rates of lift and with different support devices for two 20 minute sessions. Four independent methods were used in the evaluation: biomechanical, psychophysical, subjective survey, and body part discomfort. No device was significantly different from the control condition for the maximum acceptable weight of lift over all the participants. No significant differences were noted in the compressive force in the low back among the device treatments. No preference was determined subjectively for any specific device. No significant differences were noted based on body part discomfort measurements. The author conclude from this study that the use of lifting devices is questionable as an aid in lifting.
Keywords
Manual-lifting; Manual-materials-handling; Materials-handling; Musculoskeletal-system; Accident-prevention; Protective-equipment; Humans;
Publication Date
19890501
Fiscal Year
1989
NTIS Accession No.
PB90-103367
NTIS Price
A07
Priority Area
Low Back Disorders; Disease and Injury; Musculoskeletal-system;
Source Name
Dissertation, Industrial Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, 112 pages, 37 references
State
TX;
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