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Carbon monoxide: dosimetry in occupational exposures in Denver, Colorado.

Authors
Jabara-JW; Keefe-TJ; Beaulieu-HJ; Buchan-RM
Source
Arch Environ Health 1980 Jul; 35(4):198-204
NIOSHTIC No.
00187003
Abstract
Carbon-monoxide (630080) (CO) exposures were monitored for traffic control officers with the Denver Police Department during 8 hour workday shifts. Comparisons were selected from police department employees who worked in an office and workers at the air pollution office of the State Health Department. Measurements were made periodically from September 1978 through January of 1979. Personal air sampling was carried out using four General Electric CO dosimeters which made it possible to monitor three subjects and one comparison each day that sampling was conducted. The nonsmoking comparisons had five high dosimeter readings which averaged 18.7 parts per million (ppm) CO/hour. It was thought that these readings were due to CO leakage into the police department office from the downstairs parking garage. Omitting these five dosimeter readings, the average dosimeter reading for the nonsmoking controls would have been 6.4ppm CO/hour. While the high ranges of dosimeter readings on the traffic officers did exceed the OSHA standard of 50ppm for an 8 hour time weighted average, the levels were well within occupational standards when the average of all dosimeter readings was computed. A slight, but nonsignificant increase in readings was noted during the PM shift and during the winter months. Ambient CO measures were low when compared to the actual occupational exposures experienced by the officers. After work expired breath samples were monitored for carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. Smoking had a significant impact on the COHb levels of the subjects. Throughout the study a close association was noted between the dosimeter readings and the COHb levels. The authors conclude that CO dosimeter readings could be used as an index of CO exposure in an occupational setting.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Pulmonary-system-disorders; Automotive-emissions; Exhaust-gases; Environmental-pollution; Toxic-gases; Blood-analysis; Air-quality-monitoring; Bioassays; Policemen
Contact
Microbiology Colorado State University Department of Microbiology Fort Collins, Colo 80523
CODEN
AEHLAU
CAS No.
630-08-0
Publication Date
19800701
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
906250
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1980
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T01-OH-07039
Issue of Publication
4
ISSN
0003-9896
Priority Area
Pulmonary-system-disorders
Source Name
Archives of Environmental Health
State
CO
Performing Organization
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
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