Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Safe Manual Control of Slow-Moving Industrial Robots.

Authors
Beauchamp-Y; Jaraiedi-M; Etherton-J
Source
Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Human Factors Association of Canada, 20th Annual Conference, 14-17 October 1987, 1987 Oct:8 pages
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00186104
Abstract
Factors that may contribute to the dangerous misjudgements people can make when they must work near industrial robots were examined. Entrapment may be possible, even by a slow moving robot, particularly for individuals who must work on programming and troubleshooting. In 27 out of 36 robot related injuries in Sweden, the injured person was involved in adjustment, repair or programming tasks with moving object hazards. In a study of 170 cases, three motion control problems accounted for 145 of the cases: sudden, unprogrammed startup; robot or associated machines had not been stopped; and uncontrolled movement. Some studies of slow robot speed have been conducted to determine how quickly people can react to unexpected robot movement, but the problem may be whether or not the human will even detect the unexpected movement, especially considering the task demands on robotics technicians' attention. Research on human performance related to slow robot speed will have great impact on justifying the development of automatic safety sensing devices for robots. Quantitative information regarding slow speed requirements may be used by designers of robot controllers. Such information could result in changes in the speed limit automatically set when a manual operating mode is selected and could result in the development of training aids to help trainees understand their reaction limitations at different robot speeds. (French)
Keywords
TRANS; Safety-engineering; Safety-research; Robotics; Automation; Control-technology; Industrial-hazards;
Publication Date
19871017
Document Type
Conference/Symposia Proceedings;
Fiscal Year
1988
NTIS Accession No.
PB89-188411
NTIS Price
A02
Priority Area
Control Technology and Personal Protective Equipment; Research Tools and Approaches; Control-technology;
Source Name
Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Human Factors Association of Canada, 20th Annual Conference, 14-17 October 1987, 8 pages, 16 references
TOP