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Relaxation phenomenon in lumbar trunk muscles during lateral bending.

Authors
Raftopoulos-DD; Rafko-MC; Green-M; Schultz-AB
Source
Clin Biomech 1988 Aug; 3(3):166-172
NIOSHTIC No.
00183920
Abstract
Myoelectric activities in lumbar muscles and biomechanical analyses were carried out to determine if a flexion/relaxation phenomenon arose in lateral trunk bending. Nine male volunteers, aged 21 to 25, performed five tasks involving different degrees of lateral bending in a testing apparatus. Configurations and myoelectric activities were measured during performance of each task. Bilateral posterior and anterior myoelectric activity was obtained at the L3 level. A 22 muscle biomechanical model was used to compute contraction forces in lumbar trunk muscles and compression and shear load acting on the spine for each task and each subject. Correlations were analyzed for mean predicted muscle contraction tissue tension forces and mean measured amplitudes of myoelectric signals. No relaxation phenomenon was noted for left or right oblique abdominal muscles, either with no load or with a 5 kilogram load held in the hand on the side to which bending occurred. Although erector spinae muscles showed no relaxation during lateral bending from upright to maximum bend, they did exhibit relaxation during straightening from maximum bend to upright. A high degree of linear correlation was found for predicted contraction forces versus measured myoelectric activities, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.72 to 0.87 on both sides of the body. Relaxation effects were no longer noted on reaching 30 to 40 degrees of lateral bend during return from the maximum position. When an external load was used in bent postures or quiet standing, trunk muscle myoelectric activities increased. The authors conclude that passive mechanisms for maintenance of equilibrium are present when standing in a maximum laterally bent position, but the effects are not strong.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Grant; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Biomechanics; Muscle-function; Analytical-models; Humans; Electrophysiological-measurements; Muscle-tension; Body-mechanics; Posture
Contact
Mechanical Engineering University of Michigan Dept of Mech. Engr Ann Arbor, Mich 48109
CODEN
CLBIEW
Publication Date
19880801
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
369000.00
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1988
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-01962
Issue of Publication
3
Priority Area
Musculoskeletal-system-disorders
Source Name
Clinical Biomechanics
State
MI
Performing Organization
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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