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A model and tests for prediction of respirator adsorbent behavior.

Authors
Corn-M
Source
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, The John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 1987 Dec; :1-4
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00182775
Abstract
The Wheeler-Dubinin Model absorption model was extended to operate under more reasonable conditions of use such as measurement of multiple absorbable vapors, large adsorbent masses, and at high flow rates. The model was modified to account for increased axial dispersion in large carbon beds. Increased axial dispersion resulted in a decrease in the ratio of the kinetic saturation capacity at 1 percent to complete breakthrough. Breakthrough times deviated from experimentally determined values by as much as 38 percent, with the average deviation equal to 16.5 percent. Studies of the influence of adsorbate polarity on reference vapor selection indicated that electrostatic forces did not influence vapor adsorption when adsorbate polarities were between 0 and 2.50 daltons, and that a single reference vapor can be selected for breakthrough prediction. Studies on the effect of adsorbed water vapor on the kinetic adsorption parameters of the Wheeler equation indicated that the parameters of kinetic rate constant and kinetic saturation capacity decreased in proportion to the amount of water vapor adsorbed. Minimum values were observed at 90 percent relative humidity.
Keywords
NIOSH-Grant; Respirators; Respiratory-protective-equipment; Respiratory-protection; Personal-protective-equipment
Contact
Environmental Health Sciences Johns Hopkins University 615 North Wolfe Street Baltimore, MD 21205
Publication Date
19871201
Document Type
Final Grant Report
Funding Amount
329300
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
1988
NTIS Accession No.
PB89-129852
NTIS Price
A01
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-01646
NIOSH Division
OEP
Priority Area
Respirators
Source Name
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, The John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
State
MD
Performing Organization
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
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