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Occupational Disease Reporting.

Authors
Trasko-VM
Source
Division of Occupational Health of the Bureau of State Services, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service Publication No. 288, 1953:86 pages
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00182097
Abstract
A review of the occurrence of occupational diseases in the United States was presented with regard to the initiation of a national reporting system and determination of future toxicologic and clinical research needs. The review was divided into three parts detailing those occupational disease reporting practices in use in 1953, the results of a feasibility study for developing a national reporting system for occupational diseases, and statistics on the incidence of occupational diseases in the United States. Discussion of occupational disease reporting schemes included examination of the Workmen's Compensation Acts of Connecticut and Minnesota as examples of legal requirements for the reporting of occupational diseases and injuries, the extent of compulsory reporting laws in use in 1953, the extent of laws providing for compensation for occupational diseases and the use of compensation reports as a source of occupational disease data, and those conditions considered as occupational diseases and accidental injuries. A pilot study of health reporting in 11 states indicated problems inherent to the determination of data sources, the method of reporting, and occupational disease recognition. A survey of 43,407 cases of alleged or suspected occupational diseases reported from 28 states and for federal employees yielded general data for the incidence of systemic effects due to chemical agents, dust diseases of the lungs, respiratory disorders, disorders due to physical conditions, infective and parasitic diseases, diseases of the skin, and other conditions. The data was discussed in relation to other occupational injuries, compensation claim load and costs attributed to occupational diseases, and work time loss. Recommendations focused on the need for developing standard criteria for classifying and reporting occupational diseases and the reevaluation of reporting practices to improve report quality.
Keywords
Occupational-health; Regulations; Risk-factors; Industrial-exposures; Employee-health; Occupational-respiratory-disease; Information-systems; Morbidity-rates; Disease-incidence; Epidemiology; Workplace-studies;
Publication Date
19530101
Fiscal Year
1953
NTIS Accession No.
NTIS Price
Source Name
Division of Occupational Health of the Bureau of State Services, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service Publication No. 288, 86 pages, 21 references
State
CT; MN;
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