Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Search Results

Increase of Toxicity of Trace Anesthetics by UV Light.

Authors
Karis-JH
Source
Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Terminal Progress Report :8 pages
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00181253
Abstract
Efforts were made to determine whether trace amounts of halothane (151677) present in operating rooms and irradiated by ultraviolet (UV) light are harmful to operating room personal when chronically inhaled. The decomposition of halothane by UV light resulted in nine recognizable peaks using gas liquid chromatography. When halothane was irradiated in air or oxygen, photodecomposition was about ten times higher than when irradiated in nitrogen. Mice exposed to 3 percent UV irradiated halothane for 1 hour demonstrated an 80 percent mortality. Sleeping times increased five fold in mice exposed to 1.3 percent irradiated halothane for 90 minutes. Pentobarbital sleeping times were prolonged 1 day following exposure. An increase in serum transaminases was noted following exposure of mice to 1.3 percent irradiated halothane. Immediately following exposure to irradiated halothane, pulmonary toxicity was noted in mice. The lungs showed hemorrhagic lesions and the animals appeared dyspneic. Chronic exposures of male CD-1-mice for 7 hours/day, 5 days/week, for 30 days to 10, 100, or 1000 parts per million (ppm) UV irradiated or nonirradiated halothane were also carried out. There was no mortality in mice exposed to 10 or 100ppm, but there was a 20 percent mortality in mice exposed to 1000ppm irradiated halothane. Exposure to 1000ppm irradiated halothane resulted in a reduction in body weight. Enzyme levels were altered by exposure to irradiated halothane.
Keywords
NIOSH-Grant; Laboratory-animals; Anesthetics; Halogenated-hydrocarbons; Operating-rooms; Inhalation-studies; Enzyme-activity; Nonionizing-radiation; Toxic-gases; Photochemical-reactions;
Contact
Anesthesiology Box 3094 Duke University Durham, N C 27710
CAS No.
151-67-7;
Funding Amount
175552.00
Funding Type
Grant;
NTIS Accession No.
PB88-252630
NTIS Price
A02
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-00781
Source Name
Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Terminal Progress Report
State
NC;
Performing Organization
Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
TOP